Clickin' Moms

How My Son With Asperger’s Is Doing In The Second Grade

IMG_8789My son Drew was diagnosed with Asperger’s when he was five. That was in the middle of his preschool year. We started with ABA therapy right away. He started kindergarten a few months later. That was a challenging year. He had full-time ABA with him at school. 1st grade was similar only we encountered some other issues. However, other types of behaviors got better. It seems like it is two steps forward, one step back with him.

In the middle of last year I felt strongly that it might be a good idea to have him in the special needs class. He was having quite a lot of behavior problems. We also worked on having the school take over more than having ABA with him. This was an important step to me and something we were working towards. Towards the end of 1st grade things got a little better but I wasn’t sure how it was going to go for second grade. I knew the school was working hard with us to make sure he was getting the help he needed to get through each day. They also assured me that at anytime I can call an IEP meeting. When summer started I just knew that no matter what we would be able to figure out how to get through second grade.

Now we are about six weeks into the school year. Overall he is doing really well. I am thankful for this. He grew a lot during the summer and I could really tell he was a different kid than he was at the end of 1st grade, although with some of the same behavioral issues. He is in a regular class and that seems to be going well overall. Not so many behavioral issues, he gets on the bus a lot easier than he ever has too. His biggest issue is not wanting to do the school work he needs to do. We are making him do it once he gets home and that has been hard.

I am not sure how the rest of the year is going to go. We had an IEP meeting last week and will have another one after fall break next month. He has a list of goals and he is slowly working towards them. Some days are easier than others.

What we want for him is to know that school is important, that the work he does at school is important and that he has to go to school each day before he can play or relax. The thing about him is that if he doesn’t see the reason for it, he doesn’t want to do it. This was a major issue last year. He didn’t see why he had to go to school so he fought it a lot. I think this year he is understanding more how it works. You go to school Monday through Friday, then you have the weekends free. You go to school until about 3pm, do your homework and then you can do what you want. I think the more he understands this, the better he will be about school. I am hoping anyways.

Do you have a child with special needs? How is school going for them?

What I Have Learned About Having A Husband In The National Guard

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We are now three months into Guard life. So far that hasn’t meant too much as Ben has only had a couple of drills. However, I have learned some things I didn’t know. There were a few things I assumed about the Guard that I found out worked a little differently than I thought they would. I also almost titled this post, “What I Have Learned About Having A Husband In The National Guard: Part One” because I know that I will learn even more as the months go on.

So here goes:

1) How much you get paid. I assumed that every time Ben had drill, he would get paid the amount that is stated on some of the pay calculators. This is not true. They get paid by the amount of drill periods they complete. Each period is 4 hours. So if he works for 8 hours he would get two drill periods worth of pay. This is of course less than the full amount of pay we were thinking it would be.

2) How long they are gone on a monthly basis. When I used to hear people talk about drill weekends, I thought that meant they left Friday and you saw them again Sunday. Now I am sure this probably happens but it hasn’t been our experience so far. He has had two one day drills. As I look at the upcoming calendar I see a mix of different types of “drill weekends.” I really didn’t realize it would be like that. And even the first day he was gone I assumed he would walk in the door at 11pm that night. That didn’t happen although I am sure it could in the future. 

3) That drill can be cancelled. This hasn’t happened to us yet but I have been hearing that it has been happening in other states. I knew it had happened during the shutdown but I didn’t know it can sometimes happen during this time of year for budget reasons.

4) How often they go. Once again, when I heard that, “Once a month” phrase, I thought it would be once a month exactly. That they would go the 1st weekend of every month. But,that is not true either. It is all over the place. Sometimes we have a few weeks in-between and other times it is a lot longer. It just depends on when the drill is scheduled for.

5) That I would slip right back into Army Wife Mode when he leaves. This is the weirdest thing for me. Even though I know he is only gone one-two days, I feel different on those days then I do during the rest of the month. Why? My husband is off doing something with the Army. It isn’t so much that I am sad or upset, I don’t exactly feel that way, it is more that I am reminded of times past. Of when he used to go away while he was active duty. It is probably because during the rest of the month, he is not in Army mode. He grows out his hair, I don’t see his uniform, we don’t deal with units or any of that. Then he gets ready for drill each month and it is reminder to me that he is still serving his country in this way. So I am sure the back and forth of it will take some getting used to.

 

Is your spouse in the Guard or the Reserves? What has surprised you about it? What about Active duty life? What did you assume before you became a Military spouse?

Believe in Heroes And The Wounded Warriors Project

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Our country has been at war for many years. Many Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen and members of the Coast Guard have spent time overseas fighting for our country. Many of them have gone back for a 2nd, 3rd, 4th or even 5th time. Some even more than that. Each time they return their family members can breathe a sigh of relief but homecoming doesn’t always mean everything is just as it was when they left. From minor injuries to life changing ones to PTSD, our Wounded Warriors need the support of the American people. Even more so now that so many of them have come home.

Did you know that you can support Wounded Warriors thorough grocery shopping? The Believe in Heroes project allows you to do just that. It was started in 2010 in collaboration with Acosta Sales & Marketing. They wanted to give back to those who have made sacrifices and helped protect our country. The campaign has generated $16 million for WWP to date and has helped enable the expansion of its critical veteran programs that now directly serve more than 40,000 injured service members.

Beginning September 7, 2014 and running through Veterans Day, November 11, 2014, Believe in Heroes calls on Americans to show their support and appreciation for our service members and newest generation of veterans in a simple everyday way — grocery shopping. Each participating brand and retailer will help raise funds and awareness for WWP through the Believe in Heroes campaign.

You can go ahead and get your coupons here!  These will be available through November 30th or while supplies last.

If your family is on a budget like we are, you will find these coupons really helpful. They can help you save a little here and a little there but overtime that adds up. The best part is, using them will help the very people who have sacrificed to keep our country safe.

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The Believe in Heroes campaign is important to me as a Military Spouse. I like knowing that there are ways to give back to those that have given so much. It makes me happy to see American people and companies finding new and interesting ways to help give back. It shows that even though a Military career can be a hard one, knowing that the American people support you can go a long way. It encourages the service members  with what they have to do each day to protect the country.

  • Here is how you can help the Believe in Heroes® campaign:
    • Downloading over $25 in coupon savings by visiting http://goo.gl/X5dn6w.
    • Sharing social media posts on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
    • Purchasing Believe in Heroes® merchandise in stores or online at http://goo.gl/X5dn6w.

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I’m participating in the 2014 Believe in Heroes® blogger campaign and received compensation as part of the program. 

 

Vision To Share

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This post is about “Vision To Share” which was created by VSP Vision Care, with a mission to help people see. They created “Vision to Share” to change the life of a veteran through America’s VetDogs.

There are 21.2 million U.S. Veterans, 1.5 million of them has a vision-threatening eye disease. Many have low vision and 160,000 are legally blind. They can also be at risk of an eye injury during their time in combat.

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During this campaign, VSP will donate $50,000 to train and match a guide dog with a veteran whose vision is impaired.

  • How it works:
    • All you need to do is share!
    • Visit SeeMuchMore.com and click on “Vision to Share.”
    • Every time you share the video, VSP will donate to the care and training of a guide dog – up to $50,000!
  • America’s VetDogs provides highly trained guide dogs to help veterans lead active, independent lives. It costs $50,000 to raise and train each dog, given to the veteran at no cost.
    • Puppies are trained from birth for two years.
    • America’s VetDogs matches each dog’s skills and personality to the disabled veterans’ needs.
    • Dogs typically work with the veteran until they are 10 years old.
    • Retired dogs are adopted.

You can see more at the hashtag #SeeMuchMore

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